This year One Health Day celebrations are especially poignant. In the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, One Health is being recognized and embraced as needed now more that ever. On the zoonotic diseases front the public is beginning to understand that we are now living what the global One Health Community has been teaching and warning about for over 15 years. It is more urgent now than ever to make One Health thinking and acting the default way of doing business at all levels of academia, research, government and policy. 

During the current pandemic, in person One Health Day events are not encouraged. However, many possibilities exist for posters, YouTube, social media, radio and TV campaigns and online educational webinars to raise awareness of what One Health is and to educate about many One Health arenas.  The One Health Day Planning team urges the global One Health Community to be creative and find ways to help the world understand our urgent need for One Health.

More information about One Health Day is available online at www.onehealthday.org 

About One Health Day

One Health Day is a timely initiative that gives scientists and advocates a powerful voice for moving beyond current provincial approaches to emerging zoonotic infectious diseases, antimicrobial resistance, climate change, environmental pollution, food safety, comparative/ translational medicine and many other problems, to a holistic default way of doing business. Launched in April 2016 by three leading international One Health groups, the One Health Commission, the One Health Initiative Autonomous pro bono Team, and the One Health Platform Foundation, global One Health Day has grown into an annual platform for One Health advocates around the world to educate in their regions about One Health and One Health challenges. Anyone, from academic to private to corporate to governmental agencies can lead One Health Day events and are urged to register them to get on the annual official One Health Day map. 

About One Health

One Health is a movement to forge co-equal, all-inclusive collaborations, in both research and applied sciences, between human and animal health arenas, chemical, engineering and social scientists, dentists, nurses, agriculturalists and food producers, wildlife and environmental health specialists and many other related disciplines that fall under its purview.  As early as 2010 the World Bank recognized and published documentary evidence supporting benefits of a One Health approach in disease prevention, public health and global security. Today, the One Health approach is being increasingly accepted (https://tinyurl.com/v4te2fn)  by numerous major international organizations such as the World Medical Association (WMA), the World Veterinary Association (WVA), the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The reader can review a compilation of organizations that are actively working to advance the One Health paradigm shift and many additional  organizations and individuals that declare support for the concept. 

Contact(s): 

Cheryl Stroud, +1 984-500-8093 (USA), [email protected] 

Chris Vanlangendonck, +32 475 81 38 59 (Belgium), [email protected]